Spatial patterns of brain amyloid-beta burden and atrophy rate associations in mild cognitive impairment.

Published

Journal Article

Amyloid-β accumulation in the brain is thought to be one of the earliest events in Alzheimer's disease, possibly leading to synaptic dysfunction, neurodegeneration and cognitive/functional decline. The earliest detectable changes seen with neuroimaging appear to be amyloid-β accumulation detected by (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography imaging. However, some individuals tolerate high brain amyloid-β loads without developing symptoms, while others progressively decline, suggesting that events in the brain downstream from amyloid-β deposition, such as regional brain atrophy rates, play an important role. The main purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between the regional distributions of increased amyloid-β and the regional distribution of increased brain atrophy rates in patients with mild cognitive impairment. To simultaneously capture the spatial distributions of amyloid-β and brain atrophy rates, we employed the statistical concept of parallel independent component analysis, an effective method for joint analysis of multimodal imaging data. Parallel independent component analysis identified significant relationships between two patterns of amyloid-β deposition and atrophy rates: (i) increased amyloid-β burden in the left precuneus/cuneus and medial-temporal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the left medial-temporal and parietal regions; and (ii) in contrast, increased amyloid-β burden in bilateral precuneus/cuneus and parietal regions was associated with increased brain atrophy rates in the right medial temporal regions. The spatial distribution of increased amyloid-β and the associated spatial distribution of increased brain atrophy rates embrace a characteristic pattern of brain structures known for a high vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease pathology, encouraging for the use of (11)C-labelled Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography measures as early indicators of Alzheimer's disease. These results may begin to shed light on the mechanisms by which amyloid-β deposition leads to neurodegeneration and cognitive decline and the development of a more specific Alzheimer's disease-specific imaging signature for diagnosis and use of this knowledge in the development of new anti-therapies for Alzheimer's disease.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Tosun, D; Schuff, N; Mathis, CA; Jagust, W; Weiner, MW; Alzheimer's Disease NeuroImaging Initiative,

Published Date

  • April 2011

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 134 / Pt 4

Start / End Page

  • 1077 - 1088

PubMed ID

  • 21429865

Pubmed Central ID

  • 21429865

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1460-2156

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1093/brain/awr044

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England