Prevalence of kidney disease in HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan women.

Published online

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: In the United States, HIV-related kidney disease disproportionately affects individuals of African descent; however, there are few estimates of kidney disease prevalence in Africa. We evaluated the prevalence of kidney disease among HIV-infected and uninfected Rwandan women. METHODS: The Rwandan Women's Interassociation Study and Assessment prospectively enrolled 936 women. Associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)<60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and proteinuria were assessed in separate logistic regression models. RESULTS: Among 891 non-pregnant women with available data, 2.4% had an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) (calculated by the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation, MDRD eGFR) and 8.7% had proteinuria ≥1+. The prevalence of decreased eGFR varied markedly depending on the estimating method used, with the highest prevalence by Cockcroft-Gault. Regardless of the method used to estimate GFR, the proportion with decreased eGFR or proteinuria did not differ significantly between HIV-infected and -uninfected women in unadjusted analysis. After adjusting for age and blood pressure, HIV infection was associated with significantly higher odds of decreased MDRD eGFR but not proteinuria. CONCLUSION: In a well-characterized cohort of Rwandan women, HIV infection was associated with decreased MDRD eGFR. The prevalence of decreased eGFR among HIV-infected women in our study was lower than that previously reported in African-Americans and in other Central and East African HIV populations, although there was substantial variability depending on the equation used to estimate GFR. Future studies are needed to optimize GFR estimates and to determine the impact of antiretroviral therapy on kidney disease in this population.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Wyatt, CM; Shi, Q; Novak, JE; Hoover, DR; Szczech, L; Mugabo, JS; Binagwaho, A; Cohen, M; Mutimura, E; Anastos, K

Published Date

  • March 28, 2011

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 6 / 3

Start / End Page

  • e18352 -

PubMed ID

  • 21464937

Pubmed Central ID

  • 21464937

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1932-6203

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1371/journal.pone.0018352

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States