Factors Associated With Perceived Health Status of Multiracial/Ethnic Midlife Women in the United States.

Published

Journal Article

To identify racial/ethnic differences in perceived health status and differences in the factors associated with perceived health status of midlife women in four broad racial/ethnic groups in the United States.A secondary analysis of Web-based survey data.Internet communities/groups among midlife women and Internet communities/groups of racial/ethnic minorities.Participants included 491 women 40 to 60 years of age who self-identified into four broad racial/ethnic categories (Hispanic, non-Hispanic [N-H] Asian American, N-H African American, or N-H White).Data related to participants' sociodemographic, behavioral, situational, and individual health factors and their coping resources were selected based on the Comprehensive Health Seeking and Coping Paradigm. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to identify racial/ethnic differences in perceived health status and race/ethnicity-specific factors associated with perceived health status among midlife women.Perceived health status did not differ by race/ethnicity; however, factors that were associated with perceived health status did vary by race/ethnicity. Among N-H White women, educational level, level of family income, obesity, and menopausal symptoms were significantly associated with perceived not healthy status. In Hispanic women, perceived level of physical activity and obesity were significantly associated with not healthy status. Perceived level of physical activity was the only factor significantly associated with not healthy status in N-H Asian American women, and the level of family income was the only factor associated with not healthy status in N-H African American women.In future intervention development, researchers need to consider differences among racial/ethnic groups in the factors associated with women's perceived health status.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Ko, Y; Chee, W; Im, E-O

Published Date

  • May 2016

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 45 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 378 - 390

PubMed ID

  • 27080909

Pubmed Central ID

  • 27080909

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1552-6909

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0884-2175

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jogn.2016.02.010

Language

  • eng