Impact of urethral injury management on the treatment and outcome of concurrent pelvic fractures.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVES: Multiple treatment options exist for concurrent posterior urethral trauma and pelvic fractures. Because of the increased risk of contamination, the surgical repair of fractures may be prohibited by suprapubic urologic catheters. To characterize the incidence and long-term outcomes of these management conflicts, we reviewed our experience with concomitant pelvic fractures and posterior urethral injuries. METHODS: For a 42-month period, 61 patients with concurrent lower urinary tract and pelvic trauma, including 23 with posterior urethral injuries, were retrospectively reviewed for conflicts between urologic management and optimal treatment of the associated orthopedic injuries. RESULTS: Of the 23 posterior urethral injuries identified, the management of 8 (35%) was noted to impact the decision regarding the management and outcome of the concurrent pelvic fractures. Although the overall difference in the length of hospitalization and period of immobilization was not statistically significant, of the 4 patients whose suprapubic catheter precluded surgical orthopedic fracture repair, 3 patients (75%) remain disabled because of chronic pelvic pain, and none of those who underwent early endoscopic realignment remain disabled because of their pelvic fracture. CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic realignment for traumatic posterior urethral injuries associated with pelvic fractures, particularly acetabular fractures, should be attempted to avoid the increased morbidity associated with conservative management of the concurrent orthopedic injuries.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Mayher, BE; Guyton, JL; Gingrich, JR

Published Date

  • March 2001

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 57 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 439 - 442

PubMed ID

  • 11248615

Pubmed Central ID

  • 11248615

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1527-9995

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0090-4295

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/s0090-4295(00)01038-4

Language

  • eng