Balloon Catheter Dilation of the Sinuses: A 2011-2014 MarketScan Analysis.

Published online

Journal Article

Objective This study uses a large national claims-based database to analyze recent practice patterns related to balloon catheter dilation (BCD) of the sinuses. Study Design Retrospective study. Setting Academic. Subjects and Methods Patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) undergoing BCD and functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) from 2011 to 2014 were identified in Truven Health MarketScan Databases with codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification and Current Procedural Terminology, Fourth Edition. Prevalence of CRS and frequency of sinus procedures were trended over the study period. Information related to site of service, demographics, and comorbidities was analyzed. Results Although the prevalence of CRS and sinus procedures remained stable over the study period, there was a consistent increase in the annual number of BCD procedures performed in the office. Among BCD procedures, multisinus dilation had the largest increase. A higher proportion of patients undergoing BCD were women, aged ≥65 years, and from the South. There was a higher prevalence of headache disorder and allergic rhinitis in the BCD group, as compared with the FESS and hybrid groups. Conclusion BCD, especially in the office, has risen in popularity since the introduction of Current Procedural Terminology codes in 2011. This study reveals significant differences in demographics and comorbidities between patients undergoing BCD and those undergoing FESS. Such disparities may highlight the need for better-defined indications for use of this technology.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Jang, DW; Abraham, C; Cyr, DD; Schulz, K; Abi Hachem, R; Witsell, DL

Published Date

  • August 7, 2018

Published In

Start / End Page

  • 194599818791811 -

PubMed ID

  • 30084308

Pubmed Central ID

  • 30084308

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-6817

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1177/0194599818791811

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England