ATLAS probe: Breakthrough science of galaxy evolution, cosmology, Milky Way, and the Solar System

Published

Journal Article

Copyright © Astronomical Society of Australia 2019. Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe is a concept for a National Aeronautics and Space Administration probe-class space mission that will achieve ground-breaking science in the fields of galaxy evolution, cosmology, Milky Way, and the Solar System. It is the follow-up space mission to Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), boosting its scientific return by obtaining deep 1-4 μm slit spectroscopy for â1/470% of all galaxies imaged by the â1/42 000 deg 2 WFIRST High Latitude Survey at z > 0.5. Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy will measure accurate and precise redshifts for â1/4200 M galaxies out to z < 7, and deliver spectra that enable a wide range of diagnostic studies of the physical properties of galaxies over most of cosmic history. Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe and WFIRST together will produce a 3D map of the Universe over 2 000 deg 2 , the definitive data sets for studying galaxy evolution, probing dark matter, dark energy and modifications of General Relativity, and quantifying the 3D structure and stellar content of the Milky Way. Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe science spans four broad categories: (1) Revolutionising galaxy evolution studies by tracing the relation between galaxies and dark matter from galaxy groups to cosmic voids and filaments, from the epoch of reionisation through the peak era of galaxy assembly; (2) Opening a new window into the dark Universe by weighing the dark matter filaments using 3D weak lensing with spectroscopic redshifts, and obtaining definitive measurements of dark energy and modification of General Relativity using galaxy clustering; (3) Probing the Milky Way's dust-enshrouded regions, reaching the far side of our Galaxy; and (4) Exploring the formation history of the outer Solar System by characterising Kuiper Belt Objects. Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe is a 1.5 m telescope with a field of view of 0.4 deg 2 , and uses digital micro-mirror devices as slit selectors. It has a spectroscopic resolution of R = 1 000, and a wavelength range of 1-4 μm. The lack of slit spectroscopy from space over a wide field of view is the obvious gap in current and planned future space missions; Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy fills this big gap with an unprecedented spectroscopic capability based on digital micro-mirror devices (with an estimated spectroscopic multiplex factor greater than 5 000). Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy is designed to fit within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration probe-class space mission cost envelope; it has a single instrument, a telescope aperture that allows for a lighter launch vehicle, and mature technology (we have identified a path for digital micro-mirror devices to reach Technology Readiness Level 6 within 2 yr). Astrophysics Telescope for Large Area Spectroscopy Probe will lead to transformative science over the entire range of astrophysics: From galaxy evolution to the dark Universe, from Solar System objects to the dusty regions of the Milky Way.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Wang, Y; Robberto, M; Dickinson, M; Hillenbrand, LA; Fraser, W; Behroozi, P; Brinchmann, J; Chuang, CH; Cimatti, A; Content, R; Daddi, E; Ferguson, HC; Hirata, C; Hudson, MJ; Kirkpatrick, JD; Orsi, A; Ryan, R; Shapley, A; Ballardini, M; Barkhouser, R; Bartlett, J; Benjamin, R; Chary, R; Conroy, C; Donahue, M; Doré, O; Eisenhardt, P; Glazebrook, K; Helou, G; Malhotra, S; Moscardini, L; Newman, JA; Ninkov, Z; Ressler, M; Rhoads, J; Rhodes, J; Scolnic, D; Smee, S; Valentino, F; Wechsler, RH

Published Date

  • January 1, 2019

Published In

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1448-6083

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1323-3580

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1017/pasa.2019.5

Citation Source

  • Scopus