Male sex may not be associated with worse outcomes in primary all-posterior adult spinal deformity surgery: a multicenter analysis.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE Adolescent spine deformity studies have shown that male patients require longer surgery and have greater estimated blood loss (EBL) and complications compared with female patients. No studies exist to support this relationship in adult spinal deformity (ASD). The purpose of this study was to investigate associations between sex and complications, deformity correction, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with ASD. It was hypothesized that male ASD patients would have greater EBL, longer surgery, and more complications than female ASD patients. METHODS A multicenter ASD cohort was retrospectively queried for patients who underwent primary posterior-only instrumented fusions with a minimum of 5 levels fused. The minimum follow-up was 2 years. Primary outcomes were EBL, operative time, intra-, peri-, and postoperative complications, radiographic correction, and HRQOL outcomes (Oswestry Disability Index, SF-36, and Scoliosis Research Society-22r Questionnaire). Poisson multivariate regression was used to control for age, comorbidities, and levels fused. RESULTS Ninety male and 319 female patients met the inclusion criteria. Male patients had significantly greater mean EBL (2373 ml vs 1829 ml, p = 0.01). The mean operative time, transfusion requirements, and final radiographic measurements did not differ between sexes. Similarly, changes in HRQOL showed no significant differences. Finally, there were no sex differences in the incidence of complications (total, major, or minor) at any time point after controlling for age, body mass index, comorbidities, and levels fused. CONCLUSIONS Despite higher EBL, male ASD patients did not experience more complications or require less deformity correction at the 2-year follow-up. HRQOL scores similarly showed no sex differences. These findings differ from adolescent deformity studies, and surgeons can counsel patients that sex is unlikely to influence the outcomes and complication rates of primary all-posterior ASD surgery.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Bumpass, DB; Lenke, LG; Gum, JL; Shaffrey, CI; Smith, JS; Ames, CP; Bess, S; Neuman, BJ; Klineberg, E; Mundis, GM; Schwab, F; Lafage, V; Kim, HJ; Burton, DC; Kebaish, KM; Hostin, R; Lafage, R; Kelly, MP; International Spine Study Group,

Published Date

  • December 2017

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 43 / 6

Start / End Page

  • E9 -

PubMed ID

  • 29191095

Pubmed Central ID

  • 29191095

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1092-0684

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.3171/2017.9.FOCUS17475

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States