Cervical spine injuries in pediatric athletes: mechanisms and management.

Published

Journal Article (Review)

Sports-related injuries to the spine, although relatively rare compared with head injuries, contribute to significant morbidity and mortality in children. The reported incidence of traumatic cervical spine injury in pediatric athletes varies, and most studies are limited because of the low prevalence of injury. The anatomical and biomechanical differences between the immature spine of pediatric patients and the mature spine of adults that make pediatric patients more susceptible to injury include a greater mobility of the spine due to ligamentous laxity, shallow angulations of facet joints, immature development of neck musculature, and incomplete ossification of the vertebrae. As a result of these differences, 60 to 80% of all pediatric vertebral injuries occur in the cervical region. Understanding pediatric injury biomechanics in the cervical spine is important to the neurosurgeon, because coaches, parents, and athletes who place themselves in positions known to be associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) run a higher risk of such injury and paralysis. The mechanisms of SCI can be broadly subclassified into five types: axial loading, dislocation, lateral bending, rotation, and hyperflexion/hyperextension, although severe injuries often result from a combination of more than one of these subtypes. The aim of this review was to detail the characteristics and management of pediatric cervical spine injury.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Jagannathan, J; Dumont, AS; Prevedello, DM; Shaffrey, CI; Jane, JA

Published Date

  • January 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 21 / 4

Start / End Page

  • E6 -

PubMed ID

  • 17112196

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17112196

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1092-0684

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1092-0684

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.3171/foc.2006.21.4.7

Language

  • eng