Psychiatric Diagnoses and Other Factors Associated with Emergency Department Return within 30 Days of Ureteroscopy.

Published

Journal Article

PURPOSE: Emergency department visits after ureteroscopy are costly and inconvenient. To better understand those at risk we aimed to identify patient demographic, medical and surgical factors associated with 30-day emergency department presentation following ureteroscopy for urolithiasis with particular attention to those with a history of a psychiatric diagnosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 1,576 cases (1,395 adults) who underwent stone related ureteroscopy during 3 years at a total of 2 hospitals. We collected patient demographics, medical history and operative details. The primary outcome was return to the emergency department within 30 days of ureteroscopy. Logistic regression was performed to examine factors associated with emergency department presentation. RESULTS: Of the patients 613 (43.9%) had a history of psychiatric diagnosis. Of those with ureteroscopy encounters 12.6% returned to the emergency department within 30 days of ureteroscopy, including 58.8% with a history of psychiatric diagnosis. On multivariable analysis variables associated with emergency department return included a history of psychiatric diagnosis (OR 1.57, p = 0.012), uninsured status (OR 2.46, p = 0.001) and a stone only in the kidney (OR 1.76, p = 0.022). Patients who returned to the emergency department had had more emergency department visits in the year prior to surgery (OR 1.40, p <0.001). On univariable analysis older patients and those with longer operative time were more frequently admitted from the emergency department (OR 1.03, p = 0.002 and OR 1.96, p = 0.03. respectively) while uninsured patients were admitted less frequently (OR 0.19, p = 0.013). No difference was noted in admissions between those with a psychiatric diagnosis and all others (60.7% vs 55.8%, p = 0.48). CONCLUSIONS: We identified factors associated with emergency department return after ureteroscopy, including a history of psychiatric diagnosis, uninsured status and emergency department visits in the year before surgery. These patients may benefit from targeted interventions to help avoid unnecessary emergency department visits.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Carlos, EC; Peters, CE; Wollin, DA; Winship, BB; Davis, LG; Li, J; Scales, CD; Eaton, SH; Preminger, GM; Lipkin, ME

Published Date

  • March 2019

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 201 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 556 - 562

PubMed ID

  • 30316894

Pubmed Central ID

  • 30316894

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1527-3792

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.juro.2018.09.062

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States