Alterations in resting state oscillations and connectivity in sensory and motor networks in women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

Published

Journal Article

PURPOSE: The pathophysiology of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome remains incompletely understood but is thought to involve central disturbance in the processing of pain and viscerosensory signals. We identified differences in brain activity and connectivity between female patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and healthy controls to advance clinical phenotyping and treatment efforts for interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined oscillation dynamics of intrinsic brain activity in a large sample of well phenotyped female patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and female healthy controls. Data were collected during 10-minute resting functional magnetic resonance imaging as part of the Multidisciplinary Approach to the Study of Chronic Pelvic Pain Research Network project. The blood oxygen level dependent signal was transformed to the frequency domain. Relative power was calculated for multiple frequency bands. RESULTS: Results demonstrated altered frequency distributions in viscerosensory (post insula), somatosensory (postcentral gyrus) and motor regions (anterior paracentral lobule, and medial and ventral supplementary motor areas) in patients with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. Also, the anterior paracentral lobule, and medial and ventral supplementary motor areas showed increased functional connectivity to the midbrain (red nucleus) and cerebellum. This increased functional connectivity was greatest in patients who reported pain during bladder filling. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome have a sensorimotor component to the pathological condition involving an alteration in intrinsic oscillations and connectivity in a cortico-cerebellar network previously associated with bladder function.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Kilpatrick, LA; Kutch, JJ; Tillisch, K; Naliboff, BD; Labus, JS; Jiang, Z; Farmer, MA; Apkarian, AV; Mackey, S; Martucci, KT; Clauw, DJ; Harris, RE; Deutsch, G; Ness, TJ; Yang, CC; Maravilla, K; Mullins, C; Mayer, EA

Published Date

  • September 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 192 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 947 - 955

PubMed ID

  • 24681331

Pubmed Central ID

  • 24681331

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1527-3792

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.juro.2014.03.093

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States