Interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 as a potential biomarker in localized scleroderma.

Published

Journal Article

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and levels of interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) in the plasma and skin of pediatric localized scleroderma (LS) patients compared to those of healthy pediatric controls and to determine if IP-10 levels correlate to clinical disease activity measures. METHODS: The presence of IP-10 in the plasma was analyzed using a Luminex panel in 69 pediatric patients with LS and compared to 71 healthy pediatric controls. Of these patients, five had available skin biopsy specimens with concurrent clinical and serological data during the active disease phase, which were used to analyze the presence and location of IP-10 in the skin by immunohistochemistry (IHC). RESULTS: IP-10 levels were significantly elevated in the plasma of LS patients compared to that of healthy controls and correlated to clinical disease activity measures in LS. Immunohistochemistry staining of IP-10 was present in the dermal infiltrate of LS patients and was similar to that found in psoriasis skin specimens, the positive disease control. CONCLUSIONS: Elevation of IP-10 levels in the plasma compared to those of healthy controls and the presence of IP-10 staining in the affected skin of LS patients indicates that IP-10 is a potential biomarker in LS. Furthermore, significant elevation of IP-10 in LS patients with active versus inactive disease and correlations between IP-10 levels and standardized disease outcome measures of activity in LS strongly suggest that IP-10 may be a biomarker for disease activity in LS.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Magee, KE; Kelsey, CE; Kurzinski, KL; Ho, J; Mlakar, LR; Feghali-Bostwick, CA; Torok, KS

Published Date

  • 2013

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 15 / 6

Start / End Page

  • R188 -

PubMed ID

  • 24499523

Pubmed Central ID

  • 24499523

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1478-6362

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1186/ar4378

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England