Acceptance of rapid HIV testing among medical inpatients in New York City.

Published

Journal Article

Early diagnosis of HIV infection is important for both individual and public health. This study examined patient acceptability of routine, voluntary HIV testing in a New York City hospital serving East Harlem, a diverse community with an HIV seroprevalence of 2.6%. Consecutive admissions to the general medicine service were screened for enrollment between October 27 and November 22, 2005, and March 13 and May 9, 2006. Participants completed a self-administered printed survey and underwent rapid HIV testing. Of the 420 patients approached, 100 patients participated. The most common reason for declining participation was, "I feel too sick to participate." Participants were more likely to be men (odds ratio [OR] 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05, 2.77) and to be in a younger age group (20-49 years; OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.64, 4.45). Participants who reported one or more HIV risk factors were not more likely to answer "Yes" when responding to the statement, "I have risk factors for HIV" compared to patients who did not report any specific clinical or behavioral HIV risk factors (OR = 1.16, 95% CI 0.38,3.53). In addition, patients who reported one or more specific clinical and/or behavioral HIV risk factors were not more likely to have received prior HIV testing (OR = 1.58, 95% CI 0.58, 4.32). Three individuals were newly diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. Risk-based testing may be inadequate, as patients do not accurately assess risk and do not seek or accept testing based on risk. Routine, voluntary HIV testing is able to identify patients missed in the risk-based model of HIV testing, expanding the opportunities for timely diagnosis and intervention. In order to fully implement the new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations for routine, voluntary testing, the optimal timing to offer HIV testing to acutely ill inpatients warrants further investigation.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Jain, CL; Jue, JS; MacKay, R; Wallach, F; Factor, SH; Wyatt, CM

Published Date

  • August 2008

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 22 / 8

Start / End Page

  • 657 - 662

PubMed ID

  • 18721054

Pubmed Central ID

  • 18721054

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1557-7449

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1089/apc.2007.0189

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States