Why the Days Seem Shorter as We Get Older

Journal Article (Journal Article)

Why does it feel that the time passes faster as we get older? What is the physical basis for the impression that some days are slower than others? Why do we tend to focus on the unusual (the surprise), not on the ever present? This article unveils the physics basis for these common observations. The reason is that the measurable 'clock time' is not the same as the time perceived by the human mind. The 'mind time' is a sequence of images, i.e. reflections of nature that are fed by stimuli from sensory organs. The rate at which changes in mental images are perceived decreases with age, because of several physical features that change with age: saccades frequency, body size, pathways degradation, etc. The misalignment between mental-image time and clock time serves to unite the voluminous observations of this phenomenon in the literature with the constructal law of evolution of flow architecture, as physics.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Bejan, A

Published Date

  • May 1, 2019

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 27 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 187 - 194

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1474-0575

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1062-7987

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1017/S1062798718000741

Citation Source

  • Scopus