Which patients do not seek additional medical care after a self-management class for low back pain? An observational cohort.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVES: (1) To identify baseline variables associated with patients that sought no additional care during the 12 months following a single self-management education session for low back pain (LBP), and (2) in those who sought care, to determine whether the same variables were associated with low versus high downstream LBP-related healthcare utilization. DESIGN: An observational cohort. SETTING: Single large military hospital. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 733 patients with LBP. INTERVENTION: Single self-management education session. MAIN OUTCOMES: Eleven variables were explored in two distinct logistic regression models: (1) no additional care versus additional care, and (2) low versus high number of additional visits in the additional care group. RESULTS: In the first model, not being on active duty service (odds ratio (OR) = 1.98, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.37-2.86), low baseline disability (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.00-1.04), low baseline fear-avoidance related to work (OR = 1.02, 95% CI = 1.00-1.03), and, in the last year, no opioid prescriptions (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.00-2.07), physical therapy (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.00-2.65), or sleep disorder diagnosis (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.05-2.51) significantly increased the odds that patients would not seek any additional care. In the second model, not being on active duty service (OR = 2.18, 95% CI = 1.38-3.46), low baseline disability (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.02-1.06), and no opioid prescriptions in the prior year (OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.42-3.37) increased the odds that patients would have less visits (⩽2 visits). CONCLUSION: Our study found several variables that helped determine whether patients would seek little or no additional care during the 12 months following a self-management education class for LBP.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Garcia, AN; Cook, C; Rhon, D

Published Date

  • November 2019

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 33 / 11

Start / End Page

  • 1831 - 1842

PubMed ID

  • 31353943

Pubmed Central ID

  • 31353943

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1477-0873

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1177/0269215519865013

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England