The effect of tracheostomy delay time on outcome of patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation: A STROBE-compliant retrospective cohort study.

Published

Journal Article

The tracheostomy timing for patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) was usually delayed in our country. Both physician decision time and tracheostomy delay time (time from physician's suggestion of tracheostomy to procedure day) affect tracheostomy timing. The effect of tracheostomy delay time on outcome has not yet been evaluated before.Patients older than 18 years who underwent tracheostomy for PMV were retrospectively collected. The outcomes between different timing of tracheostomy (early: ≤14 days; late: >14 days of intubation) were compared. We also analyzed the effect of physician decision time, tracheostomy delay time, and procedure type on clinical outcomes.A total of 134 patients were included. There were 57 subjects in the early tracheostomy group and 77 in the late group. The early group had significantly shorter mechanical ventilation duration, shorter intensive care unit stays, and shorter hospital stays than late group. There was no difference in weaning rate, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and in-hospital mortality. The physician decision time (8.1 ± 3.4 vs 18.2 ± 8.1 days, P < .001) and tracheostomy delay time (2.1 ± 1.9 vs 6.1 ± 6.8 days, P < .001) were shorter in the early group than in the late group. The tracheostomy delay time [odds ratio (OR) = 0.908, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.832-0.991, P = .031) and procedure type (percutaneous dilatation, OR = 2.489, 95% CI = 1.057-5.864, P = .037) affected successful weaning. Platelet count of >150 × 10/μL (OR = 0.217, 95% CI = 0.051-0.933, P = .043) and procedure type (percutaneous dilatation, OR = 0.252, 95% CI = 0.069-0.912, P = .036) were associated with in-hospital mortality.Shorter tracheostomy delay time is associated with higher weaning success. Percutaneous dilatation tracheostomy is associated with both higher weaning success and lower in-hospital mortality.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Tai, H-P; Lee, DL; Chen, C-F; Huang, Y-CT

Published Date

  • August 2019

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 98 / 35

Start / End Page

  • e16939 -

PubMed ID

  • 31464931

Pubmed Central ID

  • 31464931

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1536-5964

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/MD.0000000000016939

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States