Overall Treatment Satisfaction 5 Years After Bariatric Surgery.

Published

Journal Article

INTRODUCTION: Up to 30 % of patients undergoing bariatric surgery are dissatisfied with treatment outcomes in the long term. The aim of this study was to examine overall satisfaction with treatment 5 years after bariatric surgery and its association with body mass index (BMI) and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). METHODS: Patients were surveyed 5 years after bariatric surgery; 108 patients had duodenal switch (DS) and 153 patients had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The main outcome was overall treatment satisfaction, assessed by a single question, and analyzed by multiple logistic regression. Estimates for continuous independent variables represent the odds ratios (OR) for a 2-standard deviation difference. RESULTS: Five years after surgery, 82.4 % of the patients were very satisfied or satisfied, whereas 17.6 % were unsure or dissatisfied. The following variables assessed at 5 years were associated with being dissatisfied/unsure: a higher BMI (OR = 6.1, 95 % CI = 2.7-14.0, p < 0.001), reduced obesity-specific HRQOL (OR = 3.0, 95 % CI = 1.1-7.8, p = 0.03), and reduced mental HRQOL (OR = 0.3, 95 % CI = 0.1-0.8, p = 0.02). We also found that a higher proportion of patients who underwent LSG, compared to DS, reported being dissatisfied/unsure (OR = 3.3, 95 % CI = 1.3-8.8, p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: Reduced mental HRQOL and obesity-related HRQOL, as well as higher BMI, were associated with less satisfaction with overall treatment outcomes 5 years after bariatric surgery. Differences in overall treatment satisfaction by type of operation warrant further investigation.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Hegland, PA; Aasprang, A; Kolotkin, RL; Tell, GS; Andersen, JR

Published Date

  • January 2020

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 30 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 206 - 213

PubMed ID

  • 31422558

Pubmed Central ID

  • 31422558

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1708-0428

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1007/s11695-019-04141-7

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States