Developing a national research agenda to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and increase safe water access and consumption among 0- to 5-year-olds: a mixed methods approach.

Published online

Journal Article

OBJECTIVE: Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption in early childhood is a public health concern. Adequate hydration in early childhood is also important. We developed a national research agenda to improve beverage consumption patterns among 0-5-year-olds. This article focuses on the process used to develop this research agenda. DESIGN: A mixed methods, multi-step process was used to develop the research agenda, including: (i) a scientific advisory committee; (ii) systematic reviews on strategies to reduce SSB consumption and increase water access and consumption; (iii) two stakeholder surveys to first identify and then rank strategies to reduce SSB consumption and increase water access and consumption; (iv) key informant interviews to better understand determinants of beverage consumption and strategies to improve beverage consumption patterns among high-risk groups; (v) an in-person convening with experts; and (vi) developing the final research agenda. SETTING: This process included research and stakeholders from across the United States. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 276 participants completed survey 1 and 182 participants completed survey 2. Key informant interviews were conducted with 12 stakeholders. Thirty experts attended the convening, representing academia, government, and non-profit sectors. RESULTS: Thirteen key issue areas and 59 research questions were developed. Priority topics were beverage consumption recommendations, fruit-flavoured drink consumption, interventions tailored to high-risk groups, and family engagement in childcare. CONCLUSIONS: This research agenda lays the groundwork for research efforts to improve beverage patterns of young children. The methods used can be a template to develop research agendas for other public health issues.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Duffy, EW; Lott, MM; Johnson, EJ; Story, MT

Published Date

  • September 5, 2019

Published In

Start / End Page

  • 1 - 12

PubMed ID

  • 31486348

Pubmed Central ID

  • 31486348

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1475-2727

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1017/S1368980019002106

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England