Religiosity and depressive symptoms among older adults in Colombia

Published

Journal Article

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and religiosity among older adults in Colombia. Methods: Data are drawn from the SABE (Salud, Bienestar y Envejecimiento) Colombia Study, a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2015 involving 19,004 community-dwelling adults aged 60 years and older living in urban and rural areas of Colombia. Depressive symptoms were measured using the Geriatric Depression scale (GDS; range 0–15), examined both as a continuous and categorical variable. Religiosity was assessed by self-rated religiosity and comfort derived from religion. Logistic and linear regression analyses were used to assess the association adjusting for confounders. Results: Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that being more religious (OR = 0.90, 95% CI = 0.85–0.95, p <.001) or perceiving greater strength or comfort from religion (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.82–0.93, p <.001) was associated with a lower likelihood of scoring above the cutoff on the GDS for significant depressive symptoms (≥6). Similarly, linear regression analyses indicated that being more religious (unstandardized beta coefficient B = −0.16, p <.001) or perceiving greater strength or comfort from religion (B = −0.20, p <.001) was associated with a significantly lower score on the GDS assessed on a continuous scale. Conclusion: Being more religious or perceiving greater strength or comfort from religion is associated with fewer depressive symptoms among older adults in Colombia.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Reyes-Ortiz, CA; Payan, C; Altamar, G; Montes, JFG; Koenig, HG

Published Date

  • January 1, 2019

Published In

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1364-6915

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1360-7863

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1080/13607863.2019.1660851

Citation Source

  • Scopus