Evaluating for disparities in place of death for head and neck cancer patients in the United States utilizing the CDC WONDER database.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

OBJECTIVE: Evaluate trends in place of death for patients with head and neck cancers (HNC) in the U.S. from 1999 to 2017 based on the CDC WONDER (Wide-ranging Online Data for Epidemiologic Research) database. MATERIALS/METHODS: Using patient-level data from 2015 and aggregate data from 1999 to 2017, multivariable logistic regression analyses (MLR) were performed to evaluate for disparities in place of death. RESULTS: We obtained aggregate data for 101,963 people who died of HNC between 1999 and 2017 (25.9% oral cavity, 24.6% oropharynx/pharynx, 0.4% nasopharynx, and 49.1% larynx/hypopharynx). Most were Caucasian (92.7%) and male (87.0%). Deaths at home or hospice increased over the study period (R2 = 0.96, p < 0.05) from 29.2% in 1999 to 61.2% in 2017. On MLR of patient-level data from 2015, those who were single (ref), ages 85+ (OR 0.78; 95% CI: 0.68, 0.90), African American (OR 0.73; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.82), or Asian/Pacific Islanders (OR 0.66; 95% CI: 0.54, 0.81) were less likely to die at home or hospice. On MLR of the aggregate data (1999-2017), those who were female (OR 0.87; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.91) or ages 75-84 (OR 0.79; 95% CI: 0.76, 0.82) were also less likely to die at home or hospice. In both analyses, those who died from larynx/hypopharynx cancers were less likely to die at home or hospice. CONCLUSIONS: HNC-related deaths at home or hospice increased between 1999 and 2017. Those who were single, female, African American, Asian/Pacific Islander, older (ages 75+), or those with larynx/hypopharynx cancers were less likely to die at home or hospice.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Stephens, SJ; Chino, F; Williamson, H; Niedzwiecki, D; Chino, J; Mowery, YM

Published Date

  • March 2020

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 102 /

Start / End Page

  • 104555 -

PubMed ID

  • 32006782

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1879-0593

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.oraloncology.2019.104555

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England