Performance feedback promotes proactive but not reactive adaptation of conflict-control.

Published

Journal Article

Cognitive control refers to the use of internal goals to guide how we process stimuli, and control can be applied proactively (in anticipation of a stimulus) or reactively (once that stimulus has been presented). The application of control can be guided by memory; for instance, people typically learn to adjust their level of attentional selectivity to changing task statistics, such as different frequencies of hard and easy trials in the Stroop task. This type of control-learning is highly adaptive, but its boundary conditions are currently not well understood. In the present study, we assessed how the presence of performance feedback shapes control-learning in the context of item-specific (reactive control, Experiments 1a and 1b) and list-wide (proactive control, Experiments 2a and 2b) proportion of congruency manipulations in a Stroop protocol. We found that performance feedback did not alter the modulation of the Stroop effect by item-specific cueing, but did enhance the modulation of the Stroop effect by a list-wide context. Performance feedback thus selectively promoted proactive, but not reactive, adaptation of cognitive control. These results have important implications for experimental designs, potential psychiatric treatment, and theoretical accounts of the mechanisms underlying control-learning. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Bejjani, C; Tan, S; Egner, T

Published Date

  • April 2020

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 46 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 369 - 387

PubMed ID

  • 32223290

Pubmed Central ID

  • 32223290

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1939-1277

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0096-1523

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1037/xhp0000720

Language

  • eng