Eyelid dermatitis in patients referred for patch testing: Retrospective analysis of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data, 1994-2016.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

BACKGROUND: Eyelid dermatitis is a common dermatologic complaint. OBJECTIVE: To characterize patients with eyelid dermatitis. METHODS: Retrospective analysis (1994-2016) of North American Contact Dermatitis Group data. RESULTS: Of 50,795 patients, 2332 (4.6%) had eyelid dermatitis only, whereas 1623 (3.2%) also had dermatitis of the eyelids and head or neck. Compared with patients without eyelid involvement (n = 26,130), groups with eyelid dermatitis only and dermatitis of the eyelid and head or neck were significantly more likely to be female, white, and older than 40 years, and to have a history of hay fever, atopic dermatitis, or both (P < .01). Final primary diagnoses included allergic contact dermatitis (eyelid dermatitis only: 43.4%; dermatitis of the eyelid and head or neck: 53.5%), irritant contact dermatitis (eyelid dermatitis only: 17.0%; dermatitis of the eyelid and head or neck: 9.8%), and atopic dermatitis (eyelid dermatitis only: 13.1%; dermatitis of the eyelid and head or neck: 13.8%). Top 5 currently relevant allergens included nickel sulfate (eyelid dermatitis only: 18.6%; dermatitis of the eyelid and head or neck: 22.5%), fragrance mix I (eyelid dermatitis only: 16.5%; dermatitis of the eyelid and head or neck: 18.3%), methylisothiazolinone (eyelid dermatitis only: 16.5%; dermatitis of the eyelid and head or neck: 17.7%), gold sodium thiosulfate (eyelid dermatitis only: 14.7%; dermatitis of the eyelid and head or neck: 11.4%), and balsam of Peru (eyelid dermatitis only: 11.9%; dermatitis of the eyelid and head or neck: 12.6%). Both eyelid-involvement groups were significantly more likely to react to gold sodium thiosulfate, carmine, shellac, dimethylaminopropylamine, oleamidopropyl dimethylamine, and thimerosal (P < .05) compared with the no eyelid involvement group. LIMITATIONS: Lack of specific distribution patterns of eyelid dermatitis and no long-term follow-up data. CONCLUSION: Patch testing remains a critical tool in evaluating patients with eyelid dermatitis.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Warshaw, EM; Voller, LM; Maibach, HI; Zug, KA; DeKoven, JG; Atwater, AR; Reeder, MJ; Sasseville, D; Taylor, JS; Fowler, JF; Pratt, MD; Silverberg, JI; Fransway, AF; Zirwas, MJ; Belsito, DV; Marks, JG; DeLeo, VA

Published Date

  • April 2021

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 84 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 953 - 964

PubMed ID

  • 32679276

Pubmed Central ID

  • 32679276

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-6787

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.jaad.2020.07.020

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States