Comprehending the lack of access to maternal and neonatal emergency care: Designing solutions based on a space-time approach.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to better understand how the lack of emergency child and obstetric care can be related to maternal and neonatal mortality levels. METHODS: We performed spatiotemporal geospatial analyses using data from Brazilian municipalities. An emergency service accessibility index was derived using the two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) for 951 hospitals. Mortality data from 2000 to 2015 was used to characterize space-time trends. The data was overlapped using a spatial clusters analysis to identify regions with lack of emergency access and high mortality trends. RESULTS: From 2000 to 2015 Brazil the overall neonatal mortality rate varied from 11,42 to 11,71 by 1000 live births. The maternal mortality presented a slightly decrease from 2,98 to 2,88 by 100 thousand inhabitants. For neonatal mortality the Northeast and North regions presented the highest percentage of up trending. For maternal mortality the North region exhibited the higher volume of up trending. The accessibility index obtained highlighted large portions of the rural areas of the country without any coverage of obstetric or neonatal beds. CONCLUSIONS: The analyses highlighted regions with problems of mortality and access to maternal and newborn emergency services. This sequence of steps can be applied to other low and medium income countries as health situation analysis tool. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT: Low and middle income countries have greater disparities in access to emergency child and obstetric care. There is a lack of approaches capable to support analysis considering a spatiotemporal perspective for emergency care. Studies using Geographic Information System analysis for maternal and child care, are increasing in frequency. This approach can identify emergency child and obstetric care saturated or deprived regions. The sequence of steps designed here can help researchers, and policy makers to better design strategies aiming to improve emergency child and obstetric care.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Cristina da Silva, N; Rocha, TAH; Amaral, PV; Elahi, C; Thumé, E; Thomaz, EBAF; Queiroz, RCDS; Vissoci, JRN; Staton, C; Facchini, LA

Published Date

  • 2020

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 15 / 7

Start / End Page

  • e0235954 -

PubMed ID

  • 32702067

Pubmed Central ID

  • 32702067

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1932-6203

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1371/journal.pone.0235954

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States