Sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States: a population-based study.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

BACKGROUND: Contemporary population-based data on characteristics associated with blood donation in the United States (U.S.) are limited. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 28,739 persons aged 18 years and older who participated in the 2016 National Health Interview Survey, a household survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. civilian population. Analyses were weighted and accounted for the complex survey design. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were estimated by multivariable log-binomial regression. RESULTS: The percentage of individuals reporting a past-year history of blood donation was 5.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3%-6.1%) and was highest in the youngest age group (18-24 years, 8.4%). A past-year history of blood donation was more common in males compared to females (6.3% vs. 5.1%; aPR, 1.12 [95% CI, 0.99-1.27]) and those born in the U.S. compared to individuals born outside the U.S. (6.4% vs. 2.4%; aPR, 1.92 [95% CI, 1.49-2.47]). The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation was significantly lower in blacks (3.9%; aPR, 0.60 [95% CI, 0.47-0.75]) and Hispanics (3.0%; aPR, 0.63 [95% CI, 0.48-0.83]) in comparison to whites (6.9%). Being a college graduate, being employed, being physically active, and never being a cigarette smoker were factors positively associated with blood donation. The percentage of individuals with a past-year history of blood donation varied by geographic census region, with prevalence being higher in the Midwest (7.3%) and South (6.0%) compared to the Northeast (4.7%) and West (4.4%). CONCLUSION: Continued differences in the blood donor population with reference to the U.S. population underscore the need to understand barriers or deterrents to blood donation. Evidence-based donor recruitment and related policies remain imperative to ensure that there is a sustainable blood supply.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Patel, EU; Bloch, EM; Grabowski, MK; Goel, R; Lokhandwala, PM; Brunker, PAR; White, JL; Shaz, B; Ness, PM; Tobian, AAR

Published Date

  • September 2019

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 59 / 9

Start / End Page

  • 2899 - 2907

PubMed ID

  • 31222779

Pubmed Central ID

  • PMC6779040

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1537-2995

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1111/trf.15415

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States