Oxygen delivery systems for adults in Sub-Saharan Africa: A scoping review.

Journal Article (Journal Article;Review)

Background: Respiratory diseases are the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Oxygen is an essential medicine used to treat hypoxemia from respiratory diseases. However, the availability and utilization of oxygen delivery systems for adults in sub-Saharan Africa is not well-described. We aim to identify and describe existing data around oxygen availability and provision for adults in sub-Saharan Africa, determine knowledge or research gaps, and make recommendations for future research and capacity building. Methods: We systematically searched four databases for articles on April 22, 2020, for variations of keywords related to oxygen with a focus on countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Inclusion criteria were studies that included adults and addressed hypoxemia assessment or outcome, oxygen delivery mechanisms, oxygen availability, oxygen provision infrastructure, and oxygen therapy and outcomes. Results: 35 studies representing 22 countries met inclusion criteria. Availability of oxygen delivery systems ranged from 42%-94% between facilities, with wide variability in the consistency of availability. There was also wide reported prevalence of hypoxemia, with most studies focusing on specific populations. In facilities where oxygen is available, health care workers are ill-equipped to identify adult patients with hypoxemia, provide oxygen to those who need it, and titrate or discontinue oxygen appropriately. Oxygen concentrators were shown to be the most cost-effective delivery system in areas where power is readily available. Conclusions: There is a substantial need for building capacity for oxygen delivery throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Addressing this critical issue will require innovation and a multi-faceted approach of developing infrastructure, better equipping facilities, and health care worker training.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Navuluri, N; Srour, ML; Kussin, PS; Murdoch, DM; MacIntyre, NR; Que, LG; Thielman, NM; McCollum, ED

Published Date

  • May 8, 2021

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 11 /

Start / End Page

  • 04018 -

PubMed ID

  • 34026051

Pubmed Central ID

  • PMC8109278

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 2047-2986

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.7189/jogh.11.04018

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • Scotland