Human papillomavirus vaccination uptake among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander adults in the United States.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

Purpose

To examined human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates and identified factors that are associated with HPV vaccination among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (NHPI) young adults aged 18-34.

Methods

Data from the 2014 Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander National Health Interview Survey were analyzed. The outcome variables were HPV vaccination initiation (receipt of ≥1 dose) and completion (receipt of ≥3 doses). Multivariable logistic regressions were used to identify socio-demographic, healthcare access and utilization factors that were associated with HPV vaccination.

Results

A total of 663 adults were included in the study. The overall HPV vaccination initiation and completion rates were 17.6% and 7.9%, respectively. Most of the respondents who had initiated and completed the vaccine were women, of multiple race, un-married, had some college or associate degree, insured, and had a usual place of getting care. In the weighted multivariable models, men were less likely to initiate (AOR = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.12, 0.34) and complete (AOR = 0.16, 95% CI = 0.07, 0.34) the HPV vaccination compared with women.

Conclusions

The low HPV vaccination coverage found in this study signals the need for more evidence-based, culturally relevant immunization and cancer prevention interventions for NHPIs. Failure to improve HPV vaccination rates may increase the burden of HPV associated preventable cancers among NHPIs and broaden disparities.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Adjei Boakye, E; Stierwalt, T; Grundy, S; Osazuwa-Peters, N; Lee, M; Elgee, M; Schootman, M

Published Date

  • February 2022

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 66 /

Start / End Page

  • 52 - 55

PubMed ID

  • 34563569

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1873-2585

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1047-2797

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.annepidem.2021.09.003

Language

  • eng