Handed foraging behavior in scale-eating cichlid fish: its potential role in shaping morphological asymmetry.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

Scale-eating cichlid fish, Perissodus microlepis, from Lake Tanganyika display handed (lateralized) foraging behavior, where an asymmetric 'left' mouth morph preferentially feeds on the scales of the right side of its victim fish and a 'right' morph bites the scales of the left side. This species has therefore become a textbook example of the astonishing degree of ecological specialization and negative frequency-dependent selection. We investigated the strength of handedness of foraging behavior as well as its interaction with morphological mouth laterality in P. microlepis. In wild-caught adult fish we found that mouth laterality is, as expected, a strong predictor of their preferred attack orientation. Also laboratory-reared juvenile fish exhibited a strong laterality in behavioral preference to feed on scales, even at an early age, although the initial level of mouth asymmetry appeared to be small. This suggests that pronounced mouth asymmetry is not a prerequisite for handed foraging behavior in juvenile scale-eating cichlid fish and might suggest that behavioral preference to attack a particular side of the prey plays a role in facilitating morphological asymmetry of this species.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lee, HJ; Kusche, H; Meyer, A

Published Date

  • 2012

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 7 / 9

Start / End Page

  • e44670 -

PubMed ID

  • 22970282

Pubmed Central ID

  • PMC3435272

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1932-6203

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1371/journal.pone.0044670

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States