SLCO1B1*5 Allele Is Associated With Atorvastatin Discontinuation and Adverse Muscle Symptoms in the Context of Routine Care.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

The SLCO1B1 genotype is known to influence patient adherence to statin therapy, in part by increasing the risk for statin-associated musculoskeletal symptoms (SAMSs). The SLCO1B1*5 allele has previously been associated with simvastatin discontinuation and SAMSs. Prior analyses of the relationship between SLCO1B1*5 and atorvastatin muscle side effects have been inconclusive due to insufficient power. We now quantify the impact of SLCO1B1*5 on atorvastatin discontinuation and SAMSs in a large observational cohort using electronic medical record data from a single health care system. In our study cohort (n = 1,627 patients exposed to atorvastatin during the course of routine clinical care), 56% (n = 912 of 1,627 patients) discontinued atorvastatin and 18% (n = 303 of 1,627 patients) developed SAMSs. A univariate model revealed that SLCO1B1*5 increased the likelihood that patients would stop atorvastatin during routine care (odds ratio 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1-1.5; P = 0.04). A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model further demonstrated that this same variant was associated with time to atorvastatin discontinuation (hazard ratio 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.4; P = 0.004). Additional time-to-event analyses also revealed that SCLO1B1*5 was associated with SAMSs (hazard ratio 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.7; P = 0.02). Atorvastatin discontinuation was associated with SAMSs (odds ratio 1.67; P = 0.0001) in our cohort.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Voora, D; Baye, J; McDermaid, A; Narayana Gowda, S; Wilke, RA; Nicole Myrmoe, A; Hajek, C; Larson, EA

Published Date

  • May 2022

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 111 / 5

Start / End Page

  • 1075 - 1083

PubMed ID

  • 35034348

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1532-6535

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1002/cpt.2527

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States