Delphi Method Consensus on Priority Global Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Conditions and Procedures.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

Objective

The objective of this study was to develop an international expert consensus on priority otolaryngology-head and neck surgery conditions and procedures globally for which national health systems should be capable of caring.

Study design

The Delphi method was employed via a multiround online survey administered to attending otolaryngologists in an international research collaborative of >180 otolaryngologists in >40 countries.

Setting

International online survey.

Methods

In round 1, participants listed the top 15 otolaryngologic conditions and top 15 otolaryngology procedures for their World Bank regions. In round 2, participants ranked round 1 responses in order of global importance on a 5-point Likert scale. In round 3, participants reranked conditions and procedures that did not achieve consensus, defined as 50% of the round 2 Likert responses being ranked as "important" or "very important." Descriptive statistics were calculated for each round.

Results

The survey was distributed to 53 experts globally, with a response rate of 38% (n = 20). Fifty percent (n = 10) of participants were from low- and middle-income countries, with at least 1 participant from each World Bank region. Ten consensus surgical procedures and 10 consensus conditions were identified.

Conclusion

This study identified a list of priority otolaryngology-head and neck surgery conditions and surgical procedures for which all national health systems around the world should be capable of managing. Acute and infectious conditions with preventative and emergent procedures were highlighted. These findings can direct future research and guide international collaborations.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Nuss, S; Patterson, RH; Cahill, GL; Alkire, B; Jue Xu, M; Salano, V; Wiedermann, J; Okerosi, S

Published Date

  • January 25, 2022

Published In

Start / End Page

  • 1945998211073705 -

PubMed ID

  • 35077240

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1097-6817

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0194-5998

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1177/01945998211073705

Language

  • eng