Association between indoor ventilation frequency and cognitive function among community-dwelling older adults in China: results from the Chinese longitudinal healthy longevity survey.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

Backgrounds

Emerging evidence suggested that indoor air pollution caused long-term adverse effects on cognitive function among older adults who spend more than 85% of their time indoors. Although high indoor ventilation can mitigate the effect of indoor air pollution on cognition among the younger population, limited evidence revealed the association between indoor ventilation and cognition among older adults.

Methods

A total of 11,853 participants aged 65 and over (female, 54.5%; mean age, 83.6 years) were included from the 2017-2018 wave of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS). Indoor ventilation frequency was measured by the self-reported frequency of opening windows per week in each season. Cognitive function was evaluated by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Multivariate Poisson regression with robust error variance was applied to assess the association between overall indoor ventilation frequency and cognitive function. We fitted in two adjusted models: Model 1 was adjusted for demographic; model 2 was further adjusted for lifestyle, socioeconomic status, health conditions, and environmental factors. The same models were also applied to measure the association between seasonal indoor ventilation frequency and cognitive function.

Results

Of 11,853 older adults, 3035 (25.6%) had cognitive impairment. A high overall indoor ventilation frequency (indoor ventilation frequency: 6-8) was significantly associated with a 9% lower likelihood of cognitive impairment than low overall indoor ventilation frequency (indoor ventilation frequency: 0-3) among Chinese older adults [Relative risk (RR): 0.91, 95% Confidential Interval (CI): 0.83-0.99] in the full adjusted model. In the subgroup analysis in four seasons, high and intermediate indoor ventilation frequency in winter were significantly associated with 8% (RR: 0.92; 95%CI: 0.86-0.99) and 16% (RR: 0.84; 95%CI: 0.78-0.90) lower probability of cognitive impairment than low indoor ventilation frequency in the fully adjusted model among Chinese older adults, respectively.

Conclusions

In this nationally representative cohort, a higher frequency of house ventilation by opening windows was significantly associated with a lower risk of cognitive impairment among Chinese older adults aged 65 and over. These results offered robust evidence for policymaking and health intervention to prevent older adults from cognitive impairment or dementia in developing regions.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Wang, W; Chen, J; Jin, X; Ping, Y; Wu, C

Published Date

  • February 2022

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 22 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 106 -

PubMed ID

  • 35130861

Pubmed Central ID

  • PMC8822634

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1471-2318

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1471-2318

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1186/s12877-022-02805-1

Language

  • eng