Effect of an educational script on postpartum contraceptive use: a randomized controlled trial.

Journal Article (Journal Article)

OBJECTIVES: Short interpregnancy intervals are associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. Increased postpartum use of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) could reduce short interpregnancy intervals. Therefore, the primary objective of our study was to evaluate if a postpartum educational script about LARC (LARC script) could increase postpartum LARC utilization at the 6-week postpartum visit. STUDY DESIGN: We completed a randomized controlled trial (1:1) of 800 postpartum women in Raleigh, North Carolina. Women were recruited from the postpartum unit and randomized to receive (intervention) or not receive (control) the LARC script prior to hospital discharge. We conducted follow-up phone interviews to assess LARC use after their 6-week postpartum visit. We used Pearson's chi-squared test to compare LARC use between arms. RESULTS: Between May 2011 and January 2012, 400 women were randomized to each arm. Three hundred sixty-nine women (92.3%) in each arm were successfully contacted after their 6-week postpartum visit. LARC use was reported by 17.6% and 13.3% of women in the intervention and control arms, respectively (p=.103). CONCLUSIONS: The LARC script did not increase LARC utilization at the 6-week postpartum visit. Future studies should evaluate interventions that address both educational and systematic barriers to postpartum LARC uptake. IMPLICATIONS: Use of a postpartum educational script focused on the intrauterine device and contraceptive implant did not increase their utilization after the 6-week postpartum visit. Future studies should evaluate interventions that address both educational and systematic barriers to postpartum contraceptive uptake.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Tang, JH; Dominik, RC; Zerden, ML; Verbiest, SB; Brody, SC; Stuart, GS

Published Date

  • August 2014

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 90 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 162 - 167

PubMed ID

  • 24833047

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1879-0518

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.contraception.2014.03.017

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States