D1 dopamine receptor binding and mRNA levels are not altered after neonatal 6-hydroxydopamine treatment: evidence against dopamine-mediated induction of D1 dopamine receptors during postnatal development.

Published

Journal Article

The role of dopaminergic innervation on the postnatal developmental expression of D1 dopamine receptors was investigated. Bilateral destruction of dopamine-containing neurons was achieved by treating rats intracisternally with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on postnatal day 3, and rats were killed on day 21. To ensure effective reduction of D1 receptor activation by residual dopamine, a group of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats was given twice daily injections of the D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390, from day 4 to 20. D1 dopamine receptor binding was assessed in the caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, and olfactory tubercle by quantitative autoradiographic analysis of [3H]SCH-23390 binding. In addition, the relative amount of D1A receptor mRNA was assessed by in situ hybridization of a 35S-labeled riboprobe. In the developing rats, neither the amount of [3H]SCH-23390 binding nor the amount of D1A receptor mRNA was altered by 6-OHDA lesioning followed by chronic treatment with SCH-23390. Thus, bilateral destruction of dopamine-containing neurons and treatment with SCH-23390 in neonatal rats did not interfere with the developmental expression of D1 receptors or alter the levels of mRNA that code for this receptor protein. Treatment of intact rats with SCH-23390 from postnatal day 4 to 20 also did not alter [3H]SCH-23390 binding or levels of D1 receptor mRNA. However, adult rats treated chronically with SCH-23390 exhibited increased [3H]SCH-23390 binding but did not show a significant change in D1 receptor mRNA levels.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Duncan, GE; Breese, GR; Criswell, HE; Johnson, KB; Schambra, UB; Mueller, RA; Caron, MG; Fremeau, RT

Published Date

  • October 1993

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 61 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 1255 - 1262

PubMed ID

  • 8376983

Pubmed Central ID

  • 8376983

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0022-3042

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England