Modified ultrafiltration improves cerebral metabolic recovery after circulatory arrest.

Published

Journal Article

Modified ultrafiltration uses hemofiltration of the patient and bypass circuit after separation from cardiopulmonary bypass to reverse hemodilution and edema. This study investigated the effect of modified ultrafiltration on cerebral metabolic recovery after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Twenty-six 1-week-old piglets (2 to 3 kg) were supported by cardiopulmonary bypass (37 degrees C) at 100 ml.kg-1.min-1 and cooled to 18 degrees C. Animals underwent 90 minutes of circulatory arrest followed by rewarming to 37 degrees C. After being weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass, animals were divided into three groups: controls (n = 10); modified ultrafiltration for 20 minutes (n = 9); transfusion of hemoconcentrated blood for 20 minutes (n = 7). Global cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon 133 clearance methods: stage I--before cardiopulmonary bypass; stage II--5 minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass; and stage III--25 minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption, cerebral oxygen delivery, and hematocrit value were calculated for each time point. At point III, the hematocrit value (percent) was elevated above baseline in the ultrafiltration and transfusion groups (44 +/- 1.8, 42 +/- 1.8 versus 28 +/- 1.7, 30 +/- 0.7, respectively, p < 0.05). Cerebral oxygen delivery (ml.100 gm-1.min-1) increased significantly above baseline at point III after ultrafiltration (4.98 +/- 0.32 versus 3.85 +/- 0.16, p < 0.05) or transfusion (4.59 +/- 0.17 versus 3.89 +/- 0.06, p < 0.05) and decreased below baseline in the control group (2.77 +/- 0.19 versus 3.81 +/- 0.16, p < 0.05). Ninety minutes of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest resulted in impaired cerebral metabolic oxygen consumption (ml.100 gm-1.min-1) at point III in the control group (1.95 +/- 0.15 versus 2.47 +/- 0.07, p < 0.05) and transfusion group (1.72 +/- 0.10 versus 2.39 +/- 0.15, p < 0.05). After modified ultrafiltration, however, cerebral metabolic oxygen consumption at point III had increased significantly from baseline (3.12 +/- 0.24 versus 2.48 +/- 0.13, p < 0.05), indicating that the decrease in cerebral metabolism immediately after deep hypothermic circulatory arrest is reversible and may not represent permanent cerebral injury. Use of modified ultrafiltration after cardiopulmonary bypass may reduce brain injury associated with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Skaryak, LA; Kirshbom, PM; DiBernardo, LR; Kern, FH; Greeley, WJ; Ungerleider, RM; Gaynor, JW

Published Date

  • April 1995

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 109 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 744 - 751

PubMed ID

  • 7715223

Pubmed Central ID

  • 7715223

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0022-5223

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/S0022-5223(95)70357-8

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States