Analyzing chronic low back pain: the relative contribution of pain coping strategies.

Published

Journal Article

Sixty-two chronic low back pain patients were administered the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) to assess the frequency of use and perceived effectiveness of a variety of cognitive and behavioral pain coping strategies. Analysis of individual variables revealed that CSQ factors, gender, physical examination findings, and chronicity of pain had significant effects on one or more of a series of pain, psychological distress or behavioral measures. To assess the relative contribution of each of these variables hierarchical stepwise regression analyses were carried out. These analyses revealed that the Helplessness factor of the CSQ explained 50% of the variance in psychological distress (Global Severity Index of the SCL-90R), and 46% of the variance in depression (Beck Depression Inventory). Patients scoring high on this CSQ factor had significantly higher levels of psychological distress. None of the demographic or medical status variables explained a significant proportion of variance in the psychological distress measures. The Diverting Attention and Praying factor of the CSQ explained a moderate (9%), but significant amount of variance in pain report. Patients scoring high on this factor had higher scores on the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Coping strategies were not strongly related to pain behavior measures such as guarding or uptime. A consideration of pain coping strategies may allow one to design pain coping skills training interventions so as to fit the needs of the individual low back pain patient.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Keefe, FJ; Crisson, J; Urban, BJ; Williams, DA

Published Date

  • March 1, 1990

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 40 / 3

Start / End Page

  • 293 - 301

PubMed ID

  • 2139204

Pubmed Central ID

  • 2139204

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1872-6623

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0304-3959

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/0304-3959(90)91126-4

Language

  • eng