Parenting practices and child disruptive behavior problems in early elementary school. Conduct Problems Prevention Research Group.

Published

Journal Article

Examined the hypothesis that distinct parenting practices may be associated with type and profile of a child's disruptive behavior problems (e.g., oppositional, aggressive, hyperactive). Parents of 631 behaviorally disruptive children described the extent to which they experienced warm and involved interactions with their children and the extent to which their discipline strategies were inconsistent and punitive and involved spanking and physical aggression. As expected from a developmental perspective, parenting practices that included punitive interactions were associated with elevated rates of all child disruptive behavior problems. Low levels of warm involvement were particularly characteristic of parents of children who showed elevated levels of oppositional behaviors. Physically aggressive parenting was linked more specifically with child aggression. In general, parenting practices contributed more to the prediction of oppositional and aggressive behavior problems than to hyperactive behavior problems, and parenting influences were fairly consistent across ethnic groups and sex.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Stormshak, EA; Bierman, KL; McMahon, RJ; Lengua, LJ

Published Date

  • March 2000

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 29 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 17 - 29

PubMed ID

  • 10693029

Pubmed Central ID

  • 10693029

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0047-228X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1207/S15374424jccp2901_3

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States