Cardiac function in alcohol-associated systemic hypertension.

Journal Article

The pathogenesis of alcohol cardiomyopathy is obscure. Because systemic hypertension is observed in one-third of alcoholics, the relation of this finding to left ventricular (LV) function was analyzed in 66 alcoholics (26 with a blood pressure of 160/95 mm Hg or higher) 4 to 5 days after alcohol withdrawal. Hypertensive alcoholics had a more abnormal ratio of preejection period/LV ejection time (PEP/ET) (0.398 +/- 0.01 vs 0.35 +/- 0.01, p less than 0.02) than normotensive alcoholics (matched normal 0.290 +/- 0.01). Hypertensive alcoholics (transitory hypertension) with blood pressures of 120/80 mm Hg or less at time of study also had more abnormal PEP/LVET than matched normotensive alcoholics (0.415 +/- 0.03 vs 0.331 +/- 0.01, p less than 0.05). In both hypertensive (77 +/- 6 dynes/cm2 X 10(3)) and normotensive alcoholics (67 +/- 4 dynes/cm2 X 10(3) LV stress was elevated (normal 46 +/- 3 dynes/cm2 X 10(3), both p less than 0.02). However, LV mass was not increased (hypertensive 96 +/- 4 g/m2; vs normotensive 100 +/- 4 g/m2; (normal 92 +/- 5 g/m2), resulting in a markedly increased stress to mass ratio (hypertensive 0.8 +/- 0.06; Normal 0.05 +/- 0.05, p less than 0.02). Hypertensive alcoholics also had LV "hyperfunction," with an increased stress/LV end-systolic volume ratio (1.7 +/- 0.1 vs 1.3 +/- 0.1 dynes/cm2 X 10(3)/ml, p less than 0.02). Thus, hypertensive alcoholics, even those with transitory hypertension, have more abnormal cardiac function than normotensive alcoholics. Presence of hypertension with hyperdynamic LV features may be a prelude to heart failure.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Friedman, HS; Vasavada, BC; Malec, AM; Hassan, KK; Shah, A; Siddiqui, S

Published Date

  • February 1, 1986

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 57 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 227 - 231

PubMed ID

  • 3946213

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0002-9149

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States