The results of replantation after amputation of a single finger.

Published

Journal Article

We reviewed fifty-nine consecutive cases of patients who had replantation of a single finger (excluding the thumb) after traumatic amputation, with an average follow-up of fifty-three months. Fifty-one (86 per cent) of the replanted fingers survived. Survival was found to be affected by the age of the patient, the number of vessels that were anastomosed, and the replantation experience of the surgeons. The survival rate was not affected by the gender of the patient, the mechanism of injury, or which finger was amputated. As compared with survival only, the functional results were most dependent on the level of amputation. The proximal interphalangeal joint in amputated fingers that were replanted distal to the insertion of the flexor superficialis tendon had an average range of motion of 82 degrees after replantation, while those amputated proximal to the insertion had an average range of motion of only 35 degrees after replantation. The average operating time was six hours and ten minutes, and the average time until the patient returned to work was 2.3 months. Based on this experience, it is our opinion that replantation of a single finger that was amputated distal to the insertion of the flexor superficialis tendon is justified, but that replantation of a single finger that was amputated proximal to this insertion is seldom indicated.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Urbaniak, JR; Roth, JH; Nunley, JA; Goldner, RD; Koman, LA

Published Date

  • April 1985

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 67 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 611 - 619

PubMed ID

  • 3980507

Pubmed Central ID

  • 3980507

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0021-9355

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States