Radioactive sources embedded in suture are associated with improved postimplant dosimetry in men treated with prostate brachytherapy.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Reports using the retropubic and transperineal technique of prostate brachytherapy suggest that adequate radiation doses are required for good clinical results with I-125. After 3 years of using loose sources (LS), radioactive sources embedded in suture (SES) were introduced into our prostate brachytherapy technique. The purpose of the present report is to determine whether dosimetric quantifiers of implant adequacy were affected by the use of SES. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between September 1999 and April 2000, 20 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy alone with a preplanned, preloaded needle technique using LS. Between May 2000 and February 2001, 20 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy alone with a preplanned, preloaded needle technique using SES. Dosimetric quantifiers (DQ) of implant adequacy were calculated using a computed tomography scan performed 1 month following prostate brachytherapy. DQ were compared between patients treated with LS and patients treated with SES. RESULTS: The demographic characteristics were similar for each group. Men treated with SES had slightly smaller prostate glands compared to men treated with LS. The mean total activity and activity per seed were similar for each group but the activity per unit volume was slightly higher for the SES group. Patients treated with SES were found to have significantly improved DQ compared to patients treated with LS. The mean V100 for patients treated with SES was 94.10% compared to 86.54% in those patients treated with LS (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In our experience using preplanning and preloaded needles, the use of SES is associated with improved postimplant DQ.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Lee, WR; deGuzman, AF; Tomlinson, SK; McCullough, DL

Published Date

  • November 2002

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 65 / 2

Start / End Page

  • 123 - 127

PubMed ID

  • 12443808

Pubmed Central ID

  • 12443808

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0167-8140

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/s0167-8140(02)00305-5

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • Ireland