Effects of beta 1-selective and nonselective beta-adrenoceptor blockade during exercise conditioning in healthy adults.

Published

Journal Article

The interaction of beta 1-selective (cardioselective) and nonselective beta-adrenoceptor blockade with exercise conditioning was investigated in 30 healthy adult persons. A double-blind protocol was used and the effects of atenolol (100 mg/day), propranolol (80 mg twice daily), and placebo were studied by treadmill testing (Bruce protocol) before and after a 2-month supervised program of dynamic exercise. Exercise tolerance was assessed by time and work performed to exhaustion. Subjects who received propranolol, but not those who received atenolol or placebo, showed an acutely impaired exercise tolerance after drug administration but before training (-8 +/- 4%, p less than 0.05). All 3 groups showed significantly improved exercise capacity following training after drug treatment had been discontinued (atenolol, 22 +/- 6% improvement; propranolol, 13 +/- 6%; placebo, 10 +/- 3%). However, when tested while still receiving medication, subjects who received propranolol failed to show significant improvement in exercise capacity. In contrast, patients who received atenolol and placebo improved significantly. The data indicate that enhancement of maximal work capacity by exercise conditioning can occur despite administration of either beta 1-selective or nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. However, the fatiguing effects of propranolol that were evident when work performance during propranolol therapy was compared with work performance while not receiving propranolol before the training program persists after training and may limit the net improvement in work capacity induced by exercise conditioning compared with the pretraining state.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • McLeod, AA; Kraus, WE; Williams, RS

Published Date

  • June 1, 1984

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 53 / 11

Start / End Page

  • 1656 - 1661

PubMed ID

  • 6375340

Pubmed Central ID

  • 6375340

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1879-1913

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0002-9149

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/0002-9149(84)90597-6

Language

  • eng