Public school segregation in metropolitan areas

Published

Journal Article

This paper presents measures of segregation in public schools for metropolitan areas. It shows that, not only are metropolitan areas very segregated, most of that segregation is due to racial disparities between districts rather than segregative patterns within districts. Metropolitan areas in the South and West tend to have larger districts, and thus feature less fragmentation by school district. Segregation at the metropolitan level appears to vary systematically with size, racial mix, and region. Because larger metropolitan areas tend to have more jurisdictions and exhibit greater differences in racial composition among jurisdictions, measured segregation rises with size, as measured by school enrollment. (JEL I21).

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Clotfelter, CT

Published Date

  • January 1, 1999

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 75 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 487 - 504

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0023-7639

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.2307/3147061

Citation Source

  • Scopus