CRIMES, DISORDERS, AND THE DEMAND FOR HANDGUNS: An Empirical Analysis

Published

Journal Article

In a recent paper, Bordua and Lizotte (1979) analyze determinants of firearm ownership using cross‐sectional data for Illinois counties. Noting that firearms may be purchased for the purpose of sport, self‐protection, or crime, they present clear evidence of sporting demand and limited evidence of defensive motives in the pattern of gun ownership. Crime rates are significant only in the equation explaining gun ownership by women (1979: 161). The purpose of the present article is to supplement the findings of Bordua and Lizotte and earlier empirical studies by focusing on the demand for handguns alone. In particular, the article analyzes the role of crime rates and fear of violence in motivating citizens to buy and keep handguns. For this purpose, aggregate time‐series and cross‐sectional data on handgun sales were collected and analyzed. Because handguns are durable pieces of equipment, it is necessary to use a model that distinguishes the stock of handguns at any one time from the rate of handgun purchases. Copyright © 1981, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • CLOTFELTER, CT

Published Date

  • January 1, 1981

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 3 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 425 - 441

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1467-9930

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0265-8240

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1111/j.1467-9930.1981.tb00258.x

Citation Source

  • Scopus