Adrenergic desensitization in left ventricle from streptozotocin diabetic swine.

Journal Article

Patients with diabetes mellitus that exhibit cardiac pump failure display compromised stroke volume, ejection fraction, and slower rates of rise and fall of left ventricular (LV) dP/dt in the absence of ischemic injury. We hypothesized that diabetic cardiomyopathy may involve decrements in adrenergic sensitivity, with specific molecular alterations in the beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR)- G protein- adenylyl cyclase (AC) signal transduction system. We assessed the effects of 3 months of streptozotocin-induced diabetes (125 mg/kg i.v.; DIAB, n = 10) on myocardial signal transduction in mini-pigs. DIAB were hyperglycemic compared to controls (CON, n = 10; 20.92 +/- 2.64 v 5.24 +/- 0.35 mM glucose), and had lower fasting insulin levels (6.46 +/- 0.97 v 13.68 +/- 3.91 microU/ml). Transmural LV free wall homogenates from DIAB exhibited similar beta AR density as CON, but decreased cAMP production (pmol cAMP/mg prot.min) using these pharmacological stimulators: 10 microM Isoproterenol plus 100 microM GTP (74 +/- 5 v 97 +/- 11); 100 microM Gpp(NH)p (116 +/- 7 v 161 +/- 17); 10 mM fluoride ion (266 +/- 16 v 324 +/- 25). No differences between DIAB and CON were observed when stimulated by 100 microM forskolin (440 +/- 20 v 429 +/- 33), suggesting no alterations in the catalytic subunit of AC. In DIAB, quantitative immunoblotting indicated slightly depressed levels of Gs (552 +/- 44 v 630 +/- 59 pmol/g ww; NS), but a significant redistribution of alpha s from the sarcolemma to the cytosol (32.7 +/- 0.82% v 25.9 +/- 1.7%). Significantly elevated levels of cardiac Gi were seen in DIAB homogenates compared to CON ventricles (2326 +/- 145 v 1522 +/- 181 pmol/g ww), with no alpha i subunit redistribution. We conclude that despite maintained beta AR density, receptor-dependent and G protein-dependent stimulation of AC is depressed so that streptozotocin-induced diabetic LV is affected by increased cardiac Gi, redistribution of Gs alpha to the cytosol, and an increase in the Gi/Gs ratio. These results help explain depressed catecholamine responsiveness and cardiac performance exhibited by diabetic patients.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Roth, DA; White, CD; Hamilton, CD; Hall, JL; Stanley, WC

Published Date

  • October 1995

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 27 / 10

Start / End Page

  • 2315 - 2325

PubMed ID

  • 8576946

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0022-2828

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • England