In vivo elongation of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament during knee flexion.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Most knowledge regarding cruciate ligament function is based on in vitro experiments. PURPOSE: To investigate the in vivo elongation of the functional bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament during weightbearing flexion. HYPOTHESIS: The biomechanical role of functional bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament under in vivo loading is different from that measured in cadavers. STUDY DESIGN: In vivo biomechanical study. METHODS: Elongation of the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament was measured during a quasi-static lunge using imaging and 3-dimensional computer-modeling techniques. RESULTS: The anterior-medial bundle of the anterior cruciate ligament had a relatively constant length from full extension to 90 degrees of flexion. The posterior-lateral bundle of the anterior cruciate ligament decreased in length with flexion. Both bundles of the posterior cruciate ligament had increased lengths with flexion. CONCLUSION: The data did not demonstrate the reciprocal function of the 2 bundles of the anterior cruciate ligament or the posterior cruciate ligament with flexion observed in previous studies. Instead, the data suggest that there is a reciprocal function between the anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament with flexion. The anterior cruciate ligament plays a more important role in low-flexion angles, whereas the posterior cruciate ligament plays a more important role in high flexion. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Understanding the biomechanical role of the knee ligaments in vivo is essential to reproduce the structural behavior of the ligament after injury (especially for 2-bundle reconstructions) and thus improve surgical outcomes.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Li, G; DeFrate, LE; Sun, H; Gill, TJ

Published Date

  • September 2004

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 32 / 6

Start / End Page

  • 1415 - 1420

PubMed ID

  • 15310565

Pubmed Central ID

  • 15310565

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0363-5465

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1177/0363546503262175

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States