Long-term efficacy of simple behavioral therapy for daytime wetting in children.

Published

Journal Article

PURPOSE: Behavioral therapy has proved benefit for children with daytime wetting but most studies have used biofeedback techniques and provide no long-term assessment of results. We previously reported similar results using simple behavioral therapy without biofeedback. We report the long-term efficacy of behavioral therapy for daytime wetting. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our program of behavioral therapy included timed voiding, modification of fluid intake, positive reinforcement techniques and pelvic floor (Kegel) exercises to promote pelvic floor strengthening and relaxation. Questionnaires to assess therapeutic efficacy were mailed to patients who had completed therapy more than 1 year previously. RESULTS: A total of 48 patients responded. Mean ages at the time of the initial clinic visit and questionnaire were 8.2 and 12.9 years, respectively. Improvement in symptoms was noted in approximately 74% of the cases during the first year following therapy. At a mean of 4. 7 years after treatment 59.4% of the patients had improved daytime urinary control, 51.1% improved daytime urinary frequency and 45.6% improved daytime urinary urgency. The frequency of urinary tract infections decreased in 56.4% of the cases. Measures of psychological well-being were also noted to be improved in a majority of patients. A total of 77.3% of the patients stated that they would recommend the program to others. CONCLUSIONS: Simple behavioral therapy without biofeedback techniques is an effective and durable first line therapy for children with daytime wetting.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Wiener, JS; Scales, MT; Hampton, J; King, LR; Surwit, R; Edwards, CL

Published Date

  • September 2000

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 164 / 3 Pt 1

Start / End Page

  • 786 - 790

PubMed ID

  • 10953156

Pubmed Central ID

  • 10953156

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0022-5347

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/00005392-200009010-00048

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States