A comparison using tissue electrical properties and temperature rise to determine relative absorption of microwave power in malignant tissue.

Published

Journal Article

This paper compares two methods for determining the radio frequency absorbed power in tissue: from the measured electrical properties of the tissue, and from the induced temperature rise per unit time. In previous research, we measured the ratio frequency electrical properties of muscle, mammary gland, and malignant mammary tissue (SMT-2A mammary adenocarcinoma) in female W/Fu isogeneic rats. From those measurements we calculated for each tissue the power absorption versus frequency, and formed the ratio of malignant-to-normal power absorption. This ratio exhibited a peak within the 150 to 400 MHz range, indicating a selective absorption of power in this type of malignant tissue over that of the normal host tissue. In the present study, by an entirely different method, we have directly tested the results of our earlier research. We filled a 20-cm-long section of rigid coaxial line (ordinarily air filled) with either normal (beef muscle or fat) or malignant (SMT-2A) tissue, and measured the temperature increase versus time at the irradiated tissue surface for the same absorbed power in each tissue type. We made the measurements from 50 to 915 MHz, and found that the initial temperature increase per second per watt absorbed (dT/dt/Pa) was greater in malignant tissue than in muscle or fat at each frequency tested, with the greatest differences occurring below 450 MHz. Power absorption based on the measured values of dT/dt/Pa was again greatest for the malignant tissue (SMT-2A mammary adenocarcinoma) within the 150 to 400 MHz range.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Joines, WT; Shrivastav, S; Jirtle, RL

Published Date

  • November 1989

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 16 / 6

Start / End Page

  • 840 - 844

PubMed ID

  • 2586369

Pubmed Central ID

  • 2586369

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0094-2405

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1118/1.596308

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States