Does homework improve academic achievement? A synthesis of research, 1987-2003

Published

Journal Article (Review)

In this article, research conducted in the United States since 1987 on the effects of homework is summarized. Studies are grouped into four research designs. The authors found that all studies, regardless of type, had design flaws. However, both within and across design types, there was generally consistent evidence for a positive influence of homework on achievement. Studies that reported simple homework-achievement correlations revealed evidence that a stronger correlation existed (a) in Grades 7-12 than in K-6 and (b) when students rather than parents reported time on homework. No strong evidence was found for an association between the homework-achievement link and the outcome measure (grades as opposed to standardized tests) or the subject matter (reading as opposed to math). On the basis of these results and others, the authors suggest future research.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Cooper, H; Robinson, JC; Patall, EA

Published Date

  • March 1, 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 76 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 1 - 62

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0034-6543

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.3102/00346543076001001

Citation Source

  • Scopus