Genetic influences on the overlap between low IQ and antisocial behavior in young children.

Published

Journal Article

The well-documented relation between the phenotypes of low IQ and childhood antisocial behavior could be explained by either common genetic influences or environmental influences. These competing explanations were examined through use of the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study 1994-1995 cohort (Moffitt & the E-Risk Study Team, 2002) of 1,116 twin pairs and their families. Children's IQ was assessed via individual testing at age 5 years. Mothers and teachers reported on children's antisocial behavior at ages 5 and 7 years. Low IQ was related to antisocial behavior at age 5 years and predicted relatively higher antisocial behavior scores at age 7 years when antisocial behavior at age 5 years was controlled. This association was significantly stronger among boys than among girls. Genetic influences common to both phenotypes explained 100% of the low IQ-antisocial behavior relation in boys. Findings suggest that specific candidate genes and neurobiological processes should be tested in relation to both phenotypes.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Koenen, KC; Caspi, A; Moffitt, TE; Rijsdijk, F; Taylor, A

Published Date

  • November 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 115 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 787 - 797

PubMed ID

  • 17100536

Pubmed Central ID

  • 17100536

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1939-1846

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0021-843X

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1037/0021-843X.115.4.787

Language

  • eng