Patient attitudes toward rooming with persons with HIV infection.

Published

Journal Article

BACKGROUND: Early in the HIV epidemic, hospitals developed strict isolation policies for patients with HIV infection, some of which have not been revised. The objectives of this study were to examine patient attitudes about rooming with persons with various medical conditions, including HIV, and to assess their knowledge about the transmission of HIV. METHODS: One hundred four inpatients at a university hospital were surveyed by means of a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire. Patients were asked about preference for a single or double room, and about their objections to rooming with patients with HIV infection and other medical conditions. The questionnaire also examined subject's knowledge about the transmission of HIV. RESULTS: Of 104 inpatients surveyed, 55% objected to rooming with an HIV-seropositive patient. Patients who objected to rooming with an HIV-seropositive patient were also more likely to object to rooming with a disfigured patient (relative risk = 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.2), or with a demented patient (relative risk = 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0 to 2.9). Also, patients who objected to rooming with an HIV-seropositive patient had greater misconceptions about the transmissibility of HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of patients reported an unwillingness to room with patients with HIV infection, but also had misconceptions about the transmissibility of HIV. Current rooming policies may perpetuate misconceptions about the possibility of causal transmission of HIV.

Full Text

Cited Authors

  • Seltzer, E; Schulman, KA; Brennan, PJ; Lynn, LA

Published Date

  • December 1993

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 37 / 6

Start / End Page

  • 564 - 568

PubMed ID

  • 8245807

Pubmed Central ID

  • 8245807

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1533-7294

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0094-3509

Language

  • eng