Parents' trust in their child's physician: using an adapted Trust in Physician Scale.

Published

Journal Article

OBJECTIVES: To assess the performance of the Pediatric Trust in Physician Scale (Pedi-TiPS) that refers to a child's physician and is a modified version of the Trust in Physician Scale (TiPS), and to explore the association of trust to demographic variables. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional survey of parents in pediatric specialty and primary care sites. Parents completed an anonymous questionnaire that included the Pedi-TiPS. Our main outcome variable was total Pedi-TiPS score (higher scores = higher trust). Reliability was determined by Cronbach's alpha. Bivariate comparisons and linear regression modeling explored potential associations between demographic variables and total score. RESULTS: Five hundred twenty-six parents completed surveys (73% response rate). The mean total score was 45.4 (SD 6), with good internal consistency (alpha = .84). In bivariate analysis, lower scores were associated with being a father (P = 0.03), older parent age (P = 0.02), private insurance status (P < 0.01), parent education greater than high school (P = 0.04), and not having a child age <3 years (P = 0.03). In a regression model adjusted for other factors, parents who were either African American (P = 0.05), or "other" race (P < 0.01), parents with private insurance (P = 0.02), and parents who had no children <3 years of age (P = 0.04) had lower trust. CONCLUSIONS: The Pedi-TiPS has properties similar to the original instrument. We found associations between trust and demographic factors that should be confirmed with further studies.

Full Text

Cited Authors

  • Moseley, KL; Clark, SJ; Gebremariam, A; Sternthal, MJ; Kemper, AR

Published Date

  • January 2006

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 6 / 1

Start / End Page

  • 58 - 61

PubMed ID

  • 16443185

Pubmed Central ID

  • 16443185

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1539-4409

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1530-1567

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.ambp.2005.08.001

Language

  • eng