Role of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CD35 and CD21), C3, C4, and C5 in survival by mice of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

Published

Journal Article

Complement-mediated opsonization and phagocytosis of encapsulated serotype 5 Staphylococcus aureus are essential to host defense. We describe the effects of complement depletion and deficiencies of C4, C5, and complement receptors 1 and 2 on mouse survival after intravenous exposure to S aureus. Depletion of complement proteins in C57BL/6 mice with the use of cobra-venom factor decreased survival compared with that of controls after the induction of bacteremia with mucoid (90% mortality), encapsulated (73%), and unencapsulated (59%) S aureus strains. In this model complement is even more important in the control of infection with encapsulated S aureus (80% of clinical isolates) than in the control of infection by unencapsulated strains. C4-deficient mice demonstrated similar mortality from bacteremia caused by encapsulated S aureus compared with controls, suggesting that in the unimmunized animal the alternative complement pathway contributes more to control of bacteremia caused by encapsulated S aureus than the classical complement pathway or mannan-binding lectin pathway. C5-deficient mice (B10.D2-H2(d) H2-T18(c) Hc(0)/oSnJ) showed similar mortality when subjected to bacteremia caused by encapsulated S aureus compared with C5-sufficient (B10.D2-Hc(1) H2(d) H2-T18(c)/nSnJ) mice, suggesting that in this model the anaphylatoxin C5a and the late complement cascade are not critical to survival of bacteremia induced with the use of these strains. However, C5-deficient mice depleted of C3 with the use of cobra-venom factor had 60% decreased survival compared with untreated C5-deficient mice with bacteremia induced by encapsulated S aureus, suggesting that in this model C3 is more critical than C5 in controlling S aureus bacteremia. Complement receptor 1 (CD35) is the primary receptor for the opsonin C3b. Mice deficient in CD35/CD21 showed a 67% decrease in survival compared with normal mice, suggesting that CD35/CD21 is of major importance in the control of S aureus-induced bacteremia.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Cunnion, KM; Benjamin, DK; Hester, CG; Frank, MM

Published Date

  • June 2004

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 143 / 6

Start / End Page

  • 358 - 365

PubMed ID

  • 15192652

Pubmed Central ID

  • 15192652

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0022-2143

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1016/j.lab.2004.03.005

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States