A prospective cohort study of late sequelae of pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

Journal Article

As survivors of pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) increase in number, it is increasingly important to evaluate their well-being. We conducted this prospective cohort study to evaluate the cumulative incidence and risk factors for late sequelae of HSCT. Comprehensive surveillance tests were performed annually on every participant, regardless of signs and symptoms, to obtain accurate information on the time-of-onset of each late event to allow hazard function analyses. All participants included in this report had been followed for at least 3 years after HSCT. With a median follow-up of 9 years and a current age of 18.5 years, only 20 of the 155 participants (13%) had no late sequelae; 18 survivors (12%) had 1 chronic health condition, 71 (46%) had 2-4 conditions, and 46 (30%) had 5-9 conditions. Risk factors for increasing number of chronic conditions included young age at the time of HSCT, female sex, high radiation dose, and history of chronic graft-versus-host disease. The cumulative incidence at 10 years for common late events was as follows (ordered by the median time-of-onset): osteonecrosis 13.8%, chronic renal insufficiency 26.8%, hypothyroidism 45.1%, growth hormone deficiency 31.2%, female hypogonadism 57.4%, osteopenia 47.7%, cataracts 43.4%, pulmonary dysfunction 63.2%, and male hypogonadism 20.3%. Coexistence of multiple late sequelae was common in HSCT survivors. Our findings provide a basis for more effective patient counseling, optimal surveillance, and early intervention.

Full Text

Duke Authors

Cited Authors

  • Leung, W; Ahn, H; Rose, SR; Phipps, S; Smith, T; Gan, K; O'Connor, M; Hale, GA; Kasow, KA; Barfield, RC; Madden, RM; Pui, C-H

Published Date

  • July 2007

Published In

Volume / Issue

  • 86 / 4

Start / End Page

  • 215 - 224

PubMed ID

  • 17632263

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 0025-7974

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

  • 10.1097/MD.0b013e31812f864d

Language

  • eng

Conference Location

  • United States